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M.S. Position in Soil Science
Investigating the Effect of Erosion on Soil Health

 

Start Date: January 2020

 

Where: Department of Agronomy at Iowa State University - Ames, IA

 

Project Description and Duties:

Candidate will carry out a project investigating the effects of erosion on soil health in Iowa.  We hypothesize that in-field erosion leads to declines in soil health and resilience.   Candidate will use novel methods to quantify erosion, and then link this to measurable soil health and resilience outcomes.  This project includes collecting soil and plant samples under inclement weather, meticulous laboratory work, analyzing data, writing up results, and presenting results to varieties of audiences.  Candidate should have a B.S. in agronomy, soil science, environmental science, physical geography, or related field.  Candidate ideally would be skilled in basic wet-chemistry laboratory equipment and geospatial technologies.  Candidate will work across soil disciplines with faculty like Drs. Bradley Miller, Richard Cruse, Randy Kolka.

 

Iowa State University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, age, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, marital status, disability, or protected veteran status and will not be discriminated against. Inquiries can be directed to the Office of Equal Opportunity, 3410 Beardshear

Hall, 515 Morrill Road, 515 294-7612, email eooffice@iastate.edu.

 

Contact:
Marshall McDaniel

2517 Agronomy Hall

Ames, IA 50014

Email: marsh@iastate.edu
Phone: (515) 294-7947

soil-field patterns42.JPG
clay knobs2.jpg

a)

b)

Figure Caption: a) aerial view of the
Des Moines Lobe landscape - a mosiac of depressions and eroded hilltops (also known as clay knobs). b) roadside view of eroded hilltop.  c) Diagram showing eroded and stable hillsope (source: Bradley Miller). 

Research question: is soil loss via erosion making our soils less healthy and resilient?

slope.jpg

c)

Soil-Plant Interactions in the McDaniel Lab

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